The Living Daylights

1987 Arcadia Systems / Domark

Platform: Arcade and Commodore Amiga

Following on from our recent post about the arcade version of Fire and Forget 2, comes yet another title that was being developed simultaneously whilst the home conversions were under way.  With The Living Daylights, it would have essentially been the Amiga game that users would have seen – well, had the Amiga version been released that is.

Arcadia Systems was set up by Mastertronic to try and break into the arcade market, and their business model was to essentially put an Amiga PCB with a game burned onto EPROMS, making for much more efficient development and a far easier way for arcade owners to swap games around. The plan would be for the home computer version to be made available 90 days after the arcade release.

The model didn’t quite work out though, with just a handful of titles released such as Aaargh! and Road Wars that performed badly. The failure is likely to have been the reason that the planned arcade release of The Living Daylights was later shelved, though I’m sure the eventual poor game design that saw release elsewhere wouldn’t have helped much either.

So how far did the Arcade/Amiga edition get? This we’re not too sure at present, though C&VG were seemingly confident, offering the chance to win the actual arcade – probably without ever seeing any evidence that something even existed.

However, what is strange is that although all the other home conversions saw release – the Amiga release wasn’t pushed out. It suggests that the issue with the arcade’s non-appearance could have been down to issues with the development itself, rather than the failure of the company model.

As of yet, it isn’t known as of yet who was behind the development. Could it have perhaps been someone behind another Amiga Arcadia title? Due to the variety of developers across those games, it is most likely going to have been someone completely different. However, contributor mt237 has found that the designer was listed as Richard Naylor, so its hoped they might know more.

If you know anything more, please do get in touch. Watch out for another arcade themed post coming soon.

With thanks to Ross Sillifant for flagging up the title and mt237 for credit contributions.

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11 Responses to The Living Daylights

    • Thanks mt237! I think Richard’s connection is a good lead to chase on, as they may well know more about the arcade and what happened as the designer of the game as a whole.

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